Trends in technology in 2015

Two recent reports highlights some of the technological trends to expect in 2015. First off, Deloitte offers its Canaidan Technology, Media and Telecommunications predictions for the year. The press release offers a summary of the 10 trends, here they are:

10 TMT Predictions most relevant in Canada (All dollar amounts are USD):

1. In-store mobile payments will (finally) gain momentum

2. For the first time, the smartphone upgrade market will exceed one billion.

3. Print is not dead, at least for print books

4. The ‘generation that won’t spend’ is spending on TMT – Millennials who are 18-34 years old in Canada will spend an average of $750 for content, both traditional and digital.

5. Click and collect booms: a boon for the consumer, a challenge for retailers.

6. The connectivity chasm deepens as gigabit Internet adoption rockets

7. The end of the consumerization of IT?

8. The Internet of things really is things, not people – In 2015, over 60 percent of the one billion global wireless IoT devices will be bought, paid for and used by enterprises – despite media focus on consumers controlling their thermostats, lights, and appliances (ranging from washing machines to tea kettles). The IoT-specific hardware will be worth $10 billion, but the services enabled by the devices will be worth about $70 billion.

9. 3D printing is a revolution: Just not the revolution you think

10. Short form video: a future, but not the future, of television

Also of interest, the Keytrends report from the Canada Media Fund, a funding agency for television production. Here are the top 6 trends:

There are fewer entry points for a growing number of overwhelmed users;

The blending of TV and online consumption continues;

Game watching and e-sports hold a growing place in the entertainment industry;

YouTube is becoming more professional, with some user-generated content achieving pro standards;

There are fewer and fewer intermediaries in revenue generation, and fan labour is becoming a major promotion source;

Worldwide, a few giants hold a growing share of the media properties and competition is intensifying.

Hat tip to the good work of Catherine Mathis from Radio Canada’s excellent Triplex blog.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s