Category: Research

Indie Games Licensing for Libraries Presentation

Aussi en français: http://www.culturelibre.ca/tag/knight/

Follow the evolution of this project here: http://outfind.ca/tag/knight/

Panel_07
Here is the presentation I will be delivering to the Knight Foundation about the Indie Games Licensing for Libraries project.

This slide explains the main idea behind the project, namely connecting indie developers with libraries through a series of copyright contracts, also called licenses:
ecosystem

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What is LIS?

Practionners have a love-hate relationship with Library and information science. Here is a recent article on the topic of whether it is a science or not:
Citation: Fredrick Kiwuwa Lugya, (2014) “What counts as a science and discipline in library and information science?”, Library Review, Vol. 63 Iss: 1/2
(Lugya says yes).

Also of interest, this recent book on theories of information:

Theories of Information, Communication and Knowledge: A Multidisciplinary Approach edited by Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan and Thomas M. Dousa (Eds.). London, UK: Springer, 2014. 380 pp. $179.00 (hardcover) (ISBN 978-94-007-6973-1)
DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-6973-1
(Also reviewed in JASIST)

Altmetrics in Context

The Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) has published a useful guide to altmetrics (pdf). Altmetrics are alternative metrics to measure the impact of research.

Also of interest, the Summer 2013 (vol. 25 issue 2) issue of Information Standards Quarterly from NISO covers altmetrics (direct link to the PDF of the full issue).

In the same vein, one can determine the impact of an institutional repository by visiting this page ranking repositories. The link send you to the Canadian listing, where my home institution’s Soectrum ranks fifth. In fact, I just learnt that I’m still in the top 10 researchers being downloaded from my University’s Institutional repository!

A quick dip in the Unified Theory of Information

I like big ideas. I really like big ideas that solve some of the theoretical issues that I worry about. That’s why I had to follow a thread that come through my RSS feeds… “Unified Theory of Information” – has a nice ring to it, no? Like leafs blown onto my yard by a chance gust of wind, I had to follow them to the tree.

First came the post, an item from a table of content from a scholarly journal:

Claudio Gnoli, Riccardo Ridi, (2014) “Unified Theory of Information, hypertextuality and levels of reality“, Journal of Documentation, Vol. 70 Iss: 3

Quick Google searches have given me these threads:
– The group behind this epistemological idea: Unified Theory of Information (UTI) Research Group – Association for the Advancement of Information Sciences
– This 20-question long essay explaining the concept by Wolfgang Hofkirchner, a central figure behind UTI.

Man, I’ll have to stop searching… I keep stumbling on these awesome pockets of ideas !!! More later on the UTI (I am not certain it is of immediate interest to my doctoral dissertation, but definitely worth keeping on my radar screen).

Ignorance… the stuff of science

Great TED Talk by Stuart Firestein called The Pursuit of Ignorance:


He gives a course at Columbia called Ignorance and I love how in his model, knowledge leads to “better” ignorance and not the reverse. In this age of readily available facts on Google and Wikipedia, the role of universities is to articulate meaningful questions that science will chip at. He uses the analogy of ripples on a pond, where knowledge is a drop in the human experience and the ripples represent the extent of our knowledge. Science and academic research aims to work beyond the edges of these ripples, in the nether regions where ignorance lies.